Fan Art Part Three and Four

Grace Lang
Sat 03.01.14
There has been so much going on at the Cotton Candy Machine lately that we fell behind with our fan art posts! Since we missed last week, we are posting two this week! The first piece comes from Erica Perjatel, who has been inspired by Tara's work for years. Here is what she has to say about the Cotton Candy Machine:

"I cannot remember when it was that I stumbled across Tara's work, but I know it was before Cotton Candy Machine opened because I was super excited that Tara was opening a gallery that I could visit...I remember her artwork being the first that I said to myself "wow, this girl is making art that I truly like, with content that is similar to what I like to paint or draw, that I would want hang in my home"...I even think that it was finding Tara's work years ago that led to me Juxtapoz and High Fructose magazines..which now has led me to so many favorite artists. I follow Cotton Candy Machine on facebook and...I think its awesome that it's a space that anyone can walk into off the street and see some amazing quality art, instead of some pretentious gallery that's intimidating."


Thanks so much for sending us your work, Erica! This piece totally reminds us of Tara's amazing Cosmic Serpent painting from her most recent solo show, Wandering Luminations. Wonderful!

The second piece comes from Alejandro Giraldo, who says he found our gallery while looking fot Tara's artwork.

He says, "It (the Cotton Candy Machine) has inspired me, not only in the way of creating, but in the way of working with other people to create things from group projects to exhibitions. It has opened my eyes to new talents and new ways of seeing art. I must have to say, that I find in Tara´s work a lot of melancholy and it touches deeply in my heart, it´s a big source of inspiration for my own work."


This piece is too sweet, Alejandro! Thank you for sending it our way! This awesome duo brings to mind Tara's Kitty Wiggle and Bunny Wiggle! Perhaps even a little Ace and Ion?

Thank you both for the beautiful work and keep it up!

The Cotton Candy Machine is beyond excited to host Amar Stewart's Hip Hop Royalty Party, exhibiting all the phenomenal work he has created while working with us in New York.

"Amar Stewart is a New York based artist from London, England. His influences lie somewhere between Music and City Life. 



Growing up in a small town in the Midlands he began drawing at a young age typically sketching super heros in his scrap book. It was only in his 20's when he moved to London that he saw a whole new world. The city being filled with so much energy and creativity fed his mind with ideas. The next 8 years would be a learning experience. Experimenting with concepts, painting techniques, travelling and finding out what path he wanted to go down."

The Cotton Candy Machine is proud to have Amar as our first ever Artist in Residence. All month long he has been in the shop painting like a madman and we have really enjoyed watching his progress.



Although painting oil portraits is not new for Amar, the pieces he has been working on at CCM have one very cool new (well, actually pretty old) influence: Dutch master Frans Hals the Elder (c. 1582 – 26 August 1666). It's true that the Dutch masters have influenced plenty of painters, but we've never seen anybody use this type of inspiration in quite the same way. Amar dubs these newest pieces "Portraits of Hip Hop Royalty" and you'd be hard pressed to find a better name. By combining the faces of beloved hip hop icons with classical 17th century attire, Amar is creating a mashup of old and new that transcends time, carving out its own unique place in today's contemporary art world.



Amar's current work pays homage to some of hip hop's greatest fallen icons. Artists like Biggie Smalls, Tupac, and Left Eye find new life in these paintings as kings and warriors, further reminding us that their legacies will never be forgotten. Just as the classical Dutch portraiture that inspires Amar's work has stood the enormous test of time, these modern day "masters" of Hip Hop are sure to inspire future artists for generations to come.



But Amar is not only painting icons that have passed on. Mary J. Blige, Eminem, and Action Bronson are some of the living artists featured in his new paintings. The faces are recognizable, but we've never seen them looking like this. Eminen stares out at us from beneath a massive cavalier hat, while Mary J. Blige somehow manages to make a huge ruffled collar look timeless and even chic. Simply put, Amar's paintings push the boundaries of what we think of as "modern art." They are like time travellers, adapting into the modern world without completely losing their roots in the past.









Amar Stewart has proven himself as an artist who can pull direct influence from art history, while crafting images that are entirely his own. We love the work he has made here so far and cannot wait to see what the remainder of his residency will bring forth, as well as the work he continues to make in the future.

Please join us on Saturday March 1st for a celebration of Amar's new paintings and a chance to meet this incredible artist!

Amar Stewart
Hip-Hop Royalty Party Saturday March 1st
7pm to 11pm

Open Studio Artist Residency Tuesday to Sunday Noon to 8pm
Email for private viewings info@thecottoncandymachine.com

To see more of Amar's work, check out his website or follow him on instagram!

Here at the Cotton Candy Machine, we love when music and art come together. Tara McPherson never ceases to amaze us with her visual art, but did you know she can also DJ like no one's business?! While in Mexico City for a pop up shop at Custom Rock Garage, Tara made a special Valentines DJ appearence at Caradura and totally rocked it. We have just brought back some fantastic posters from this very cool event!

DJ Set at Caradura Poster
By Tara McPherson
Signed Lithograph
17" x 27"
* There is slight wrinkling on the top right corner from travel, so there is only a $10 price tag!

Purchase Info Here!



The awesome poster layout was done by Smithe with one of Tara's new paintings from her Wandering Luminations show at Jonathon Levine Gallery.

Thank you to everyone who made it to this event as well as the signing at Guru Galeria. We only have limited quantities on this lithograph so act fast!

Check out these super rad photos of Tara rocking out, courtesy of @absolute_n!!




Tara McPherson Gig Posters

Grace Lang
Tue 02.18.14
Do you like music? Do you like art? YOU ARE IN LUCK! We just released a ton of Tara McPherson's earliest gigposters on our website! Many of Tara's popular characters and motifs find their roots in her early poster art, so owning one is a pretty amazing opportunity.

Click Here to Check Out All Our Rock Posters!!

Take, for instance, this 2002 poster for the Blackheart Procession...



Tara McPherson fans are all familiar with her heartless girl, but did you know this poster marks her first appearence ever?! Comissioned by the Knitting Factory in Hollywood, the poster not only features rockin' indie bands, but also has special significance to the artist. Can you think of a better reason for adding it to your collection?

Black Heart Procession, Ilya, Pleaseeasaur
By Tara McPherson
$25
Lithograph
11" x 17"
Edition of 300
2002
Signed and numbered.


Purchase Info Here!

Another amazing poster that has a special place in Tara's heart is this one she did for the Stitches, the Fakes, and the New Detectives back in 2002.



She cites herself as the client for this poster, as she used to play bass in the New Detectives. How cool is that? Featuring three awesome bands and some tasty looking shrimp, this poster is a must for Tara's collectors and fans. She says of it, "I think this was my first decent poster," making it basically a piece of contemporary art history.

The Stitches, The Fakes, The New Detectives
By Tara McPherson
$25
Lithograph
11" x 17"
Edition of 300
2002
Signed and numbered.


Purchase Info Here!

We do not have many remaining prints for most of these awesome posters and once they are gone, they are gone forever, so act fast!!

Fan Art Part Deux

Grace Lang
Sun 02.16.14
This week's awesome fan art post comes from Kellie Huskisson, a UK artist and big Tara McPherson fan. This piece was made for a "tributes" book, which featured Kellie's favorite female artists, musicians and characters. Here is what Kellie has to say about Tara and the Cotton Candy Machine:

"I was first introduced to her work around 2005 when i first started university and picked up a book on rock poster art. Amongst the hundereds of artists in the book, her work was some that really stood out to me, her use of colour and gorgeous clean line work really drew me in. Through my years in art college i looked into more of her work, her characters and methods. She has become one of my all time favourite artists so of course i had to include her in my series of awesome ladies!

Being from the UK, i had yearned to be able to make a trip to CCM at some point. What could be better than a boutique dedicated to one of my favourite artists and also featured other artists i was a big fan of? I was able to do this during a trip to NYC back in 2012 and it didn't disappoint. A sweet, individual space that hosts some of the best artists in my opinion. And lovely staff too! I hope i can make it back some time soon."

We hope you can too, Kellie! Thank you for the fantastic piece and continue to rock!



Snowdrop Pop Up in Mexico City!

Sean Leonard
Mon 02.10.14

Tara McPherson is heading back to Mexico City!



Guru Gallery and Custom Rock Garage are hosting us for a Cotton Candy Machine Pop up in DF. Along with a beautiful selection of prints and goodies we are bringing down Tara also will have some Original Drawings for sale. Make sure to come and say hello for the event! See you in Mexico City! Join us this Thursday February 13th at 8pm! Here are more of the details for you!

La dinámica para asistir al evento de Tara McPherson en Custom Rock Garage #lapagina este jueves 13 de febrero es el siguiente:

Envía tu nombre completo a: galeria@gurugalleryshop.com con el asunto: Evento Tara Mcpherson.
Las primeras 150 personas estarán dentro, el correo es personal.
Si eres uno de los afortunados en poder asistir, el día lunes 10 de febrero recibirás un mail de confirmación con todos los datos.

Si ya enviaste tu correo, no es necesario que lo hagas nuevamente, sólo espera tu confirmación.

Sólo podrán entrar las personas que estén en la lista de invitados.


The dynamics for the event of Tara McPherson in Custom Rock Garage #lapagina this Thursday February 13 is as follows: send your full name a: galeria@gurugalleryshop.com with the subject: event Tara Mcpherson.
The first 150 people will be inside, the mail is personal.
If you're one of the lucky ones in order to help the day Monday, February 10 will receive an e-mail of confirmation with all details.

If you already sent your email, it is not necessary to do it again, only awaiting your confirmation.

Only they can enter people that are on the guest list. (Translated by Bing)

Tara's DJ set on Valentines Day! 



"So excited I'm going to Mexico City next week!! In addition to the event we are doing with Guru Galeria at Custom Rock Garage on Thurs the 13th, I am going to DJ at Caradura on Valentines Night! Come dance with me! (Awesome poster layout by Smithe with one of my new paintings!)"

17" x 27"
Signed Lithograph
* There is slight wrinkling on the top right corner from travel. So there is only a $10 price tag!
Buy the Poster Here!

Our First Fan Art Post!

Grace Lang
Sun 02.09.14
Our first Fan Art post comes from the awesome 17 year old Andrea Antomattei, who lives in Queens with her chihuahua and grandmother.



Andrea was first exposed to Tara McPherson's work through the movie Juno, in which Tara's art was prominently featured, decorating the title character's bedroom.

She says, "the way you (Tara) created your own style, the way you made the colors so unique, and the way you were able to give a strong message just took my artist heart away. Once I knew who you were and heard that you had a store in Brooklyn I remember waking up my grandmother at 11:00 at night and begging her to take me. She yelled at me I spanish. But I went ... My curiosity ran wild and it felt like I was knowing the secrets of becoming a great artist. Since then, I knew that I wanted to be just like you. To have my own business, my own artwork up in New York, and to inspire other people ... Your work will always be in a special place in my heart , not only for your amazing talent but for helping to understand heart breaks"

Thank you for reaching out, Andrea! Your work is wonderful and we are so happy that our gallery inspires you. Keep it up!

Hey fans! Are you inspired by Tara McPherson or one of the other artists we feature? Perhaps just Cotton Candy? Show us! We want to see your art!

Every Sunday, we will be posting a new piece of awesome fan art on the Cotton Candy Machine blog. How cool is that? Please send your images to info@thecottoncandymachine.com with "Fan Art" as the subject and tell us a little bit about how the Cotton Candy Machine inspires you!

We are pleased to release our newest Canvas Print from Tara!

On sale NOW! "My Love Flows Out Like A Waterfall" Canvas
Giclee by Tara McPherson
$200.00


Click Here to Buy!



Tara created the painting "My Love Flows Out Like A Waterfall" for her "Inside Nostalgia" series in 2009. The original painting is acrylic on birch. This canvas giclee looks an awful lot like the real thing!

16" x 24"
Giclee Print on Canvas
Signed and Numbered Edition of 100


• Acid and lignin free, heavyweight, cotton-poly blend archival canvas.
• Environmentally friendly, water-based protective coating approved by Wilhelm Research, Epson and HP to increase light fastness and help seal and protect artwork from moisture, humidity, atmospheric contaminants, abrasion and fingerprints.
• Gallery wrap stretched over 1.5” thick heavy duty stretcher frames giving clean edges and corners for a museum quality look.
• Canvas prints will begin shipping on February 11th, 2014



Talking Art with Tina Lugo

Grace Lang
Tue 01.28.14
One of my favorite things about working at the Cotton Candy Machine is the constant exposure to amazing artists. Almost every day I write down another name to look up when I get home. Tina Lugo is one of those artists. Her work in our Brooklyn Biennial Submissional Show got (and continues to get) an incredible response, which is only natural since her work RULES. Tina's images are dark, yet vivid with color. They are humorous, yet evocative of much deeper feelings too. Simply put, she is a rad girl with a lot of talent. I recently bombarded her with some questions and her responses were truly excellent. Thank you, Tina!



Can you remember the first time you realized you were meant to make art?

I definitely knew that I liked drawing at a young age, but i was convinced that I was destined to be a veterinarian. Mind you I was four. I would draw and color to the point that i had every crayon color memorized, from mac n' cheese to periwinkle blue. But I was going to be a veterinarian... It wasn't until middle school, after much Toonami, that i realized i wanted to create the things i was seeing-since my dreams were crushed of becoming a Thunder cat, drawing became all i wanted to do.
 
You graduated from SVA pretty recently, right?
 
Yes. In 2011. Good year.

Your pieces have such a specific voice. I know from my own experience that art school professors often dissuade students from trying too hard to find a “personal style.” Did you experience any of this at SVA? Tell me a little bit more about how you found your voice as an artist. Was it a natural evolution or did your work take a drastic turn at some point?

Definitely. There was always a teacher saying 'you don't have a voice until you are a junior'. It was frustrating, but it made a lot of sense. They didn't want you to be closed minded, or think there was only one way of approaching something, or only one grand master technique. They encouraged experimenting with your craft. It was a natural growth in some ways, you always have to make some bad art in order to make some good art and be able to admit that your professors knew what they were talking about. Even if you were too stubborn to listen. If it wasn't for all of that, i'd probably still be trying to be an illustrator.

Do you feel like art school helped you more with developing your techniques or your ideas as an artist? Or is it both? Neither? I’m always interested to know how other art school graduates look back on their education.

There is always the classic debate: should i go to art school when i can teach myself? Its a personal decision, and for me, i would never had met some of the greatest peers and friends i have now, nor the wonderful artists that taught me that i can now call friends. There is only so much you can do on your own, and it definitely helped having people around me who have made their living off making art. They gave me a lot to digest, from new artists I had never heard of before, to actually showing me new techniques that may suit my needs and the artists who have used them in interesting ways. Despite some debt, (more then some) i would do it all over again.

When you dropped your pieces off at the Cotton Candy Machine for the Brooklyn Biennial show, I was immediately drawn (art pun!) to them, mainly for the bright colors and intense imagery. When I looked closer, it took me a little while to figure out your technique, which is painting on plexiglass. That is what intrigued me most. Even though I love all the pieces, I especially loved looking closely at “Candy Crush” because you can really see how the technique adds dimension to the work. Instead of using white paint, you leave negative space for the white paper beneath the plexi to show through. So cool! Please tell me everything you possibly can about your technique. How did you discover it? When did you begin working this way? What is the process like?

Senior year was the year that made me. I was still struggling with where i fit as an illustrator and slowly began hating the process and how formulated it could become. My portfolio professor suggested i try something else. He kicked my ass a lot and was known for making students cry and hate themselves. I never got a chance to thank him for doing it though. It pushed me to paint and pushed me to want to be better than what i was doing. He told me to try Plexiglas, since i had absolutely no patience for things drying, and loved working at a fast pace. So i experimented with it but wasn't finding as much traction as i wanted. I had started an internship with the limited free time i had,  being a painting assistant for French artist, Nicolas Touron. It was unpaid, except for awesome Vietnamese sandwiches he bought me every Friday, and the pleasure of working on his colorful pieces. He showed me how to use bright color and a limited color pallet. He worked at a stellar pace and i watched him as much as i could. He showed me the paints he used-what i would later work with-and his fluid process. It was a big turning point for me and my work. But my process wasn't as easy to start as I expected. The oil base line work was permanent and I had to be careful with what I put down. I've never been the type to do a crazy amount of sketches or drafts. Once I had an idea I just went for it. The tricky part was knowing that I am essentially painting backwards, as the finished product would later be mounted on the painted side. So I played a lot in the mirror, figuring out what looked good, and if it was readable when flipped over. It taught me a lot about how we see things, and how we read imagery much like a book-from left to right. Once the line work is done, I go over in a paint by numbers fashion and rarely mix -unless I can't find the color already made somewhere. I can complete a piece in about 6 hours from start to finish. Once I realized that I could drop that number even lower by working with negative space using a heavy white paper instead of white paint, I was thrilled with the result.
 

Your work is obviously pretty emotionally charged, but maintains a darkly humorous element too. When you begin a piece, are you consciously trying to “say something” or are you acting on impulse and allowing the meaning to sort of emerge naturally? If you are trying to say something, what is it?

I was a late bloomer in life, and also pretty naive. I wasn't into sex, although I was curious. I was obsessed with the animated world and was very much afraid of growing up and what that meant. I deterred as many sexual experiences as I could. When it eventually happened, it paralyzed me and I no longer knew how to be a kid anymore. I struggled with sex and my sexuality for a long time, and it took a very special person to show me how not to be afraid of it. Much of my work comes from that place, of wanting to be that kid, to be innocent again but being too far gone. I grew a sense of humor about it all. A childish enthusiasm about sexuality and how differently we all experience it. Sometimes I paint so blindly, just adding in things that would live in this dreamscape and it isn't until later that I can pull some twisted experience that I may have had from it.

Tell me a little bit about your experience applying to and being part of the Brooklyn Biennial show at the Cotton Candy Machine. Were you familiar with the space? Had you attended any of our past shows?

I had sent work to CCM  a long time ago, but admittedly I wasn't ready. The work just wasn't ready. When my job moved me into the neighborhood - a mere block away, my buddy Matty pushed me to go and talk to the people there. I met Sean, introduced myself as non-creepily as I could, mentioned that I just had a show put together by Jonathan Levine, and he told me about the show he was making and said I should submit. So I did. I didn't think I'd be picked-I never do. When he told me he wanted me in it I was thrilled! But also dreading it, as most of my work was already gone. I had to make three new pieces within two weeks for the show.

What was your impression of the Brooklyn Biennial show as a whole?

I thought the show was pretty great! I was impressed with the space, and the atmosphere. It was definitely my kind of scene. We had some pretty amazing artists present.


Do you have a favorite moment or memory from that night? It must have been really exciting for you!  

Oh its so hard to choose just one! But it would have to be meeting Tara McPherson and her telling me that she bought one of my pieces. It was a definite NO WAY  kind of moment. Its nice to know I'm part of her erotica collection.


I gotta ask, do you ever experience shocked or horrified reactions to your work from conservative people? Maybe the elderly? How do you deal with it?

Of course! All the time. But we all know its the conservative ones that secretly like it the most. There's always a "wow...thats uh, that's something" but never had someone  outright disgusted, at least not to my face. Someone said I was spreading hate speech and had my Facebook fan page deleted. Who they are, I will never know. It can be disheartening but I am always honest about what I do. Its something I will have to deal with because of the nature of what I do. I accept that.


What are you working on now? Future projects? Hopes? Dreams?

I'm working on new pieces now. I want to have a series put together to have another show this year, and maybe one day, be represented. That's definitely the dream. My goal is to paint big, like storefront window big and have a whole gallery space to myself.  But that will happen when I have the money and space to do such a thing. Everything will come in its own time. But it would be pretty exciting to see that wouldn't it?

Tell me, in the simplest terms, WHY you create art.

I wouldn't be able to function as a normal person if I didn't feed my creativity. The longer I go without it, the more anxiety and irritability forms. Its the same way someone goes for a run to clear their head, or picks up a hobby to escape for awhile. Its a basic need by now.






Questions by Grace Lang
All Photos by Austin Crimmins

To see more of Tina's painting process, check out these videos!






We will be having a closing party for the Brooklyn Biennial Show this Saturday from 7-11 pm. Tina, as well as some of the other featured artists will be there, so come on by if you want to meet some crazy talented folks! Dima Drjuchin, who also has work in the show, will be playing some music live at the event. He is bringing his custom guitar and his pedals to entertain us. All the work will be coming down after the party, so it marks your last chance to come see the show. It's sure to be a killer evening, full of art, music, and lots of laughs. We'd love to see everybody there!

Brooklyn Biennial Submissional
Closing Party Saturday February 1st
7pm to 11pm

Cotton Candy Machine
235 South 1st Street
Brooklyn, Ny 11211

Gotham Exhibition At Fice Gallery

Cotton Candy Machine
Fri 01.17.14
Our good friends at Fice Gallery in Salt Lake City are having an opening tonight for their Gotham exhibition featuring some great NYC based artists. Cotton Candy Machine's own Lyejm Kallas-Lewis will be exhibiting along with Bonethrower, Cope2, Faust, Ricky Powell, Pixote, 13th Witness, Stash, Sara Blake, Kalvin Lazarte, Russ Karablin, Craig Wetherby, Leif McIlwaine, Anthony Vasquez, and Jhon (Nohjcoley) Wright. This will be a show you won't want to miss!! If you area in the are make sure and check it out.

Gotham Exhibition at Fice Gallery
160 E 200 S, Salt Lake City, UT 84111
Phone: (801) 364-4722
Email: ficegallery@me.com
www.ficegallery.com

Contact Fice for pricing and availability.



Here is a little sneak peak of a few of Lyejm's pieces for the exhibition:






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